What You Need To Do To Get Your Message Heard

I was recently asked, “What form of communication do you use to communicate with teens?”  I replied, “As many forms as possible.”  The number one mistake we all make when it comes to communicating is not doing it enough.

You could have a thought, communicate that thought and believe that everyone else now has that same thought, but that would be foolish.  To communicate effectively and make your message stick you need to:

How To Make Your Content Stick

You know what you want teens to know, but getting them to embrace it is a challenge.  Many times it’s easy to blame teens for not having the passion.  But, it might not be a passion problem you are experiencing.  Your delivery system could just stink.

Content is key and to make it stick you need a solid delivery system.  If you cannot communicate content effectively it will lose it’s authority and impact.  To communicate effectively and keep your students engaged you need to make sure you have:

5 Myths That Hold Us Back From Asking People To Serve

We all hope that day will come when a line of people randomly show up to serve in your ministry.  But, that never happens.  You need to go find the right people.  But, asking someone to serve is intimidating.

It’s complicated because we’ve bought into the lies of who should serve and how to get them.  Those lies hold us back from extending an invitation.  To move past the myths that hold us back you need to debunk them.

5 myths that have held me back from asking people to serve were:

5 Actions To Get More Out Of Your Team

I’m asked, “How do I get more out of my leaders?” We know the more we get out of our leaders the better our ministry will be.

It’s a loaded question.  It’s a question that deals with getting volunteers to show up to trainings.  It’s making sure everyone is showing up equipped and ready to go.  The truth is to get more you need to:

Why Sharing Your Story Is So Important

Now that Rebuilding Youth Ministry is out people have asked me how it all started.  The how was simple.  I took blog posts and journal entries together.  But, the why I started writing is a whole different question.

So, why did I start writing the book?  Someone invited me to share my story.  And I accepted the invitation to share my story because of how much I’ve benefitted from the stories of fellow youth workers.  And I think it’s important for you to do the same.

I’m not suggesting that you write a book, but I think it’s important for all youth workers to share their story in some way or another because: