How You Start Matters

Our staff was reflecting on the past year and the question was asked, “What did you learn last year?” One staff member shared that he learned, “How you start something matters.”

Imagine a youth ministry more efficient and productive.  Imagine having margin in your week.  All of those would be possible if you started out strong.  To get there you need to change a few things. To start any project or program on the right foot you need to:

How To Step Back In After Being Away

One of the reasons we don’t take time off is the fear of missing something while being away.  We picture the inbox filling up and the workload multiplying.  The idea of going back is daunting.

To tackle that overwhelming feeling of getting back to work you need to find the right pace.  To step back in after being away you need to make sure you:

4 Characteristics Of A High-Capacity Leader

Your ministry needs more than just warm bodies to make it run at a high level.  Your ministry needs volunteers who are leaders.  It needs high-capacity leaders willing to take your ministry to a new level.

Where to find these leaders can be a challenge.  While some might pop out of the wood work others need to be cultivated. To create a culture of high-capacity leaders you need to know what one looks like.  They are people who:

6 Tasks Get Done Before The New Year

The weeks before the end of the year is like the final sprint before the finish line of a race. Everyone is moving to get as much done. Then New Years Eve happens, we breathes and the marathon starts all over again.

Whether you are ramping up or winding down it’s important to set yourself up for success before the new year begins.  After all youth ministry is a journey. While you can anticipate some things, many are still a surprise.

To set yourself up for the best year ever doesn’t take a lot of effort, in fact it can be real simple.  Here are 6 small steps you can take before the new year begins:

Why You Need To Be More Professional

To be a professional youth minister takes a lot of work.  It’s something we all know, but what it means to be a professional youth minister isn’t always clear.

I can show up to work in jeans, and throw pizza parties. And, I’m responsible for the spiritual journey of the thousands of teenagers in my zip code.  

Many times people see the pizza, but not the burden of a professional youth minister.  That needs to change.  To go beyond pizza and lock-ins youth ministry needs to be taken seriously.  To do that you need to: